Featured Star: Audrey Hepburn
As Holly Golightly in Breakfast At Tiffany's (1961)

This Belgian beauty's inimitable blend of regal grace and elfin innocence made her an immediate international screen and stage sensation, and her stylish presence became a cinema staple throughout the Baby Boom generation. Though born to the prosperity inherent to a British banker father and a Dutch noblewoman mother, Audrey Kathleen van Heemstra Ruston came to know hardship at age six when her father walked out on the family. She was ten when her mother elected to relocate to the Netherlands; Nazi Germany would occupy the country the following year, and while Audrey pursued her love of ballet over the WWII era, she also met with malnutrition that would compromise her physical and professional development.

After the war, the family relocated to Amsterdam, and Audrey pursued dance and modeling; she received her first screen appearance in the 1948 Dutch comedy "Dutch In Seven Lessons." A dance school scholarship brought her to London in 1949, and chorus opportunities on the stage, and small roles in British films like "The Lavender Hill Mob" followed. The young actress was thereafter chosen by Collette to originate the role of "Gigi" on Broadway, and her rave reception ensured a Hollywood courtship. She followed with one of the splashiest debuts in American cinema history, as her charming runaway princess of "Roman Holiday" resulted in a smash hit for Paramount and a Best Actress Oscar.

The studio signed her to a seven-picture deal, and the gracious gamine dominated the decade with efforts like "War And Peace," "Funny Face," and "Love In The Afternoon," as well as her Oscar-nominated work as the Cinderellaesque chauffeur's daughter "Sabrina" and the conflicted novitiate of "The Nun's Story." The early '60s saw her receive another Academy nomination for a signature performance as Truman Capote's flight party girl Holly Golightly in "Breakfast At Tiffany's." She followed this with memorable work in "The Children's Hour," "Charade," "Paris--When It Sizzles," "My Fair Lady" "How To Steal A Million," and "Two For The Road."

After her final Oscar-nominated performance--as the blind woman terrorized by killers in "Wait Until Dark"-- Hepburn opted for semi-retirement, spending her time with family and her energies to support of UNICEF and aid to starving children. Highlights from the sporadic balance of her screen career include "Robin And Marian," "They All Laughed" and her last film appearance in Steven Spielberg's "Always." Succumbing to colon cancer in 1993 at age 63, she was a posthumous recipient of AMPAS' Jean Hersholt Award for her humanitarian work.

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